Router Channel 14 The Banned Channel

By | January 24, 2015

Router channel 14 the banned channel

 
Each country in the world controls their own wireless spectrum with most following the same frequency standard.
 
Some countries however add something’s other countries don’t. When this happens manufactures that sell wireless devices like routers build firmware /software that can be changed from one country to the next.
 
Channel 14 is one of those things that fall into this category.
 
Original channel 14 could be used in United States but was later banned and removed from routers.
 
Channel 14 is on the highest end of the WiFi frequency and works in the 2.484 GHz spectrum. It is designed to only work with 802.11b legacy routers.
Router channel 14 the banned channel
 
If the country code is changed in the router to Japan then channel 14 can still be used since it is legal in Japan.
 




 
In America channel 14 was banned in 2005 and has it marked as restricted and the FCC uses language such as “No operation on channel 14 is allowed”.
 
It is a bit of a mystery why they banned this channel working at 2.48 GHz is a well known frequency that microwave ovens use when they are turned on. Possibly this frequency interferes with surveillance equipment the government and states have began to use widely, such as traffic cameras.
 
It is still a mystery since a home wireless router doesn’t transmit that far. Usually max transmitting power of a router is 300 feet with the rare exception of someone using a wireless booster possibly a 1000 feet.
 
The consequences of using channel 14 is not specified although technically disobeying the FCC is a felony. Although I highly doubt they would come knocking on any ones door for using it unless they had a huge transmitting output.
 
The reason channel 14 is interesting.
In a crowded WiFi environment packet collisions happen when two routers are on the same channels and transmitting. When packet collisions happen the router must resend the packet slowing down the whole network.
 
The 5 GHz range has been introduced with Dual Band routers to fight the overcrowded 2.4 GHz band but a signal on 5 GHz doesn’t travel as far as 2.4 GHz can.
 
For this reason manually setting a router to a channel that is unused on the 2.4 GHz range in a crowded area can greatly boost a signal and transmitting speed. It should be noted that there is overhang on channels so for example if channel 5 is used some data will be transmitted on channel 4 and 6.
 
Since channel 14 is no longer used even in crowded places a router setup on channel 14 should theoretically outperform all the others fighting to get a signal through.
 

 

 



5 thoughts on “Router Channel 14 The Banned Channel

  1. Rodney McKay

    Cantenna maybe?
    Also you can get relay stations which “look” exactly like a weather station.
    Bit of solar power and it should work but quite expen$ive to set up.
    Add a Pi Zero W to each node with two cantennas one with the Pi in it and the other with a cheapass 2.4G dongle or salvaged PCB from a Wifi enabled printer and this could work, for about $120 on 8GB per node.
    Zero W can also locally cache data so if one node in the chain drops out whatever you were downloading gets retransmitted. I call it the “Gate Bridge”

    Reply
  2. MIB

    Channel 14 is also used on the ISS.
    Interesting note: by changing one component on a Bluetooth dongle (don’t ask!) its possible to get it to transmit at a frequency which will literally attract a “Scoop” aka black van with guys wearing dark suits and dark glasses) within half an hour or less depending on location.
    Note that you need to use a really old laptop with somewhat custom modifications.

    I suggest if some fool tries this they invest in a good pair of running shoes!!! Scoops suck.

    Reply
  3. Randolph W Lievertz

    Channel 14 also falls into the Amateur Radio band in the USA. Interference with Bluetooth is more likely the problem since the power output is so small.

    Reply
  4. JPhi1618

    Channel 14 also overlaps almost exactly with Bluetooth. Channel 14 is 2484MHz and Bluetooth is 2483MHz. I’m not sure if this has anything to do with why it’s banned, but it’s probably a good thing that it was banned, and hacking a router to use it could possibly give you poor Bluetooth performance in the house, or at least near the router.

    Reply
  5. Victor Franklin

    Hello to all , I in the boonies my provider is Syncwave im less than a half mile from the pole they built here in our little berg of 400 people in the middle of the manistee national forest , and 10 miles from the shore of lake Michigan. I am simply ready to hack wifi not steal someone’s open source it I fixed all the boards or modules back in the day with the old eprom technology. I know ram rom and run but im getting older my ping is decent but I can stream about 480 sometimes 720 . They just upgraded my loco nano station with a bigger horn it helped but they use a small tp-link router n I stream mobdro showbox megabox cinema box but I can’t stream REALLY good hd. Im getting wiser slowly and don’t want to pay 100 a month out of my small ss check. Thanks Victor

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.